‘Calon Lân’ is a hymn which is close to the heart of any Welsh person, and is regarded even today as one of the great anthems of Wales. While it has been translated into English, it is still only ever sung in the original Welsh. Having been written in the closing decade of the nineteenth century, it came to prominence during the Welsh Revival of 1904-5 when it was one of the most frequently sung expressions of spiritual longing and desire for personal holiness by those who were caught up in that great move of the Holy Spirit. The song has remained a great favourite ever since, still often being sung at concerts and eisteddfodau, and even before international rugby matches at the Millenium Stadium in Cardiff. It has even developed the status of one of the great icons of Wales; and even t-shirts, mugs, badges, caps, cards and posters can be seen in many ‘Welsh’ shops with the words of the song on them. Its iconic status reflects the deeply-rooted and rich Christian heritage that is still a strong part of Welsh culture even today. 

“What had drawn me to meet this young choir was something I saw online.  As well as being beautifully dressed in traditional clothes and singing hymns in Mizo they also sang ‘Calon Lân’ in Mizo but also in perfect Welsh.  I’m currently working on a couple of projects still under wraps to celebrate Swansea at 50 and as soon as I saw that performance, I knew I need to meet them and to record and film them too.” (Mal Pope)

In April 2019 the Morriston Orpheus Choir held a number of its rehearsals at Mynyddbach Chapel in Swansea. The Chapel hosts the Calon Lân Centre in recognition of Daniel James, who wrote the words of Calon Lân, and who is buried in the Chapel graveyard.The Choir took the opportunity to film this short tribute (with thanks to Colin Rees and David Hammond-Williams for producing the video)